Last edited by Voodoodal
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

3 edition of Shinto as seen by foreign scholars. found in the catalog.

Shinto as seen by foreign scholars.

Motohiko Anzu

Shinto as seen by foreign scholars.

by Motohiko Anzu

  • 24 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Nippon bunka chuo renmei (Central federation of Nippon culture) in Tokyo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shinto

  • Edition Notes

    Reprinted from Cultural Nippon, vol. VI, no. 4.

    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2], 13 p.
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17600215M
    OCLC/WorldCa4414371

    history of Shinto have revolutionized our understanding of the Way of the Kami, and how and why some scholars continue to portray Shinto as a particularly Japanese, aesthetic, and experien-tial form of religion. For more than a century, people both inside and outside Japan have portrayed Shinto as “the essence of the Japanese people”— D. Japanese Scholars View of the Shinto Religion Words | 4 Pages. The Shinto religion is seen in two different lights by Japanese scholars. One is the view that the role of Shinto in Japanese history as a periphery religion and reliant on Buddhist ideals for its success.

    Shinto Norito - A Book of Prayers (perfect bound) Ann Llewellyn Evans. out of 5 stars Paperback. $ # Religions of Japan in Practice George J. Tanabe Jr. out of 5 stars 4. Paperback. $ # From Jesus to Christ: The Origins of the New Testament Images of Jesus. Shinto can be emotionally touching without a person ever setting foot in Japan. And while Shinto is deemed "Japanese" and indeed has had a great hand in the country's development and societal structure, there are many aspects of it that are worldwide. Reverence for the earth is .

    The books, he hopes, will spark “a new interest in the multifaceted aspects of the Shinto tradition, and a desire to know more beyond stereotypes (generated both in Japan and in the West). I also hope that new generations of scholars will further develop the field — there is so much that has never been studied, but at the same time, an. The word Shinto is a combination of two kanji (Chinese characters): "shin", meaning gods of spirits, and "tō" meaning a way or path (like Tao in Chinese). So Shinto is often translated as "The Way of the Gods". Shinto can be seen as a form of animism. The afterlife, and belief, are not.


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Shinto as seen by foreign scholars by Motohiko Anzu Download PDF EPUB FB2

Japanese Shinto underwent enormous changes both before and after the Meiji Restoration. Beginning inShinto was called kokka shinto (State Shinto). The government controlled and employed Shinto for imperialistic and militaristic purposes.

Prior to this time, however, Shinto had been a culture lived by Japanese people. "But for anyone interested in Shinto studies, religion and nationalism, and the contested and ever-changing nature of religious traditions, this is an essential read." (Religious Studies Review, 1 March ) "Written by two scholars at the forefront of the study of Japanese religions, this book offers much more than a ‘brief history’.Cited by:   Ironically, it was in this medieval, highly Buddhist-inflected period of Ise’s social history — when Japan was seen as a cosmic Buddhist mandala stretching out from Ise across Japan, “the original land of Mahāvairocana” — that Ise as a site of Shinto was first articulated.

Shinto, also known as kami-no-michi, is a religion originating in fied as an East Asian religion by scholars of religion, its practitioners often regard it as Japan's indigenous religion and as a nature rs sometimes call its practitioners Shintoists, although adherents rarely use that term is no central authority in control of the movement and much.

Shinto (神道, Shintō), also kami-no-michi, is the indigenous religion of Japan and of most of the people of Japan. George Williams classifies Shinto as an action-centered religion; it focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently in order to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient roots.

The written historical records of the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki first. Distinguished scholar of Japanese religions and culture Helen Hardacre offers the first comprehensive history of Shinto, the ancient and vibrant tradition whose colorful rituals are still practiced today.

Under the ideal of Shinto, a divinely descended emperor governs through rituals offered to deities called Kami. These rituals are practiced in innumerable shrines across the realm, so that. "Written by two scholars at the forefront of the study of Japanese religions, this book offers much more than a ‘brief history’.

It is in fact a very bold and lucid attempt to redraw the parameters that govern our understanding of that elusive body of thought and practice we call Shinto. In Japan, there are more t shrines and priests.

Shinto practices are deeply rooted in Japanese society, and also influence the practitioners of other religions, such as rs think of Shinto as “Japan’s traditional religion”, as opposed to foreign religions followed by a smaller percentage of the population.

Distinguished scholar of Japanese religions and culture Helen Hardacre offers the first comprehensive history of Shinto, the ancient and vibrant tradition whose colorful rituals are still practiced today. Under the ideal of Shinto, a divinely descended emperor governs through rituals offered to deities called Kami.

—Shinto as Seen in the Reports of Missionaries— In a letter sent from Kagoshima on the 5th day of the 10th month ofXavier stated that most Japanese worshipped the sun and moon. Cosme de Torres who continued in Xavier's place likewise reported that the Japanese worshipped the sun, moon and all other things, but that they also.

Zhong focuses on the figure of Hirata Atsutane (–) and his book True Pillar of the Soul, which positioned Ōkuninushi as a cosmic deity with control over death and the afterlife; the book also rendered Shinto as a native epistemology that could hold its own in competition with foreign modes of knowledge.

In Atsutane’s rendering. Postwar Shrine Shinto, on the other hand, has shown more of an openness toward other ethnicities, cultures and beliefs — so much so that Florian Wiltschko, a.

Shinto and Buddhism were officially separated during the Meiji Restoration and the brief, but socially transformative rise of State Shinto followed. In post-war modern Japan, most families count themselves as being of both religions, despite the idea of "official separation".

Distinguished scholar of Japanese religions and culture Helen Hardacre offers the first comprehensive history of Shinto, the ancient and vibrant tradition whose colorful rituals are still practiced today. Under the ideal of Shinto, a divinely descended emperor governs through rituals offered to deities called Kami.

These rituals are practiced in innumerable shrines across the realm, so that. The generative matrix of the book derives from a seminal article by Toshio Kuroda entitled “Shinto in the History of Japanese Religion,” originally published in English in The editors underline the enormous importance of this article, which argued that Shinto as an independent religion took shape only in the modern period, having.

Helen Hardacre, a leading scholar of religious life in modern Japan, examines the Japanese state's involvement in and manipulation of shinto from the Meiji Restoration to the present.

Nowhere else in modern history do we find so pronounced an example of government sponsorship of a religion as in Japan's support of s: 1. Shinto, The Native Religion of Japan Shinto (or Kannagara no michi) is an ethnical religious framework in Japan and a polytheistic religion that is unique to Japan.

Shinto is a religion originating in particular cultural traditions that have been believed since ancient Japan. Stretching from the earliest of creation myths up to the present day, this is as comprehensive study of Shinto as you’re likely to find.

Examined from a wide spectrum of perspectives such as political, social, religious, gender, and others, I am in awe of Hardacre’s scholarship and her dedication in putting this book /5(11). The essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics on Shinto and kami in history, including the profound formative influence of Taoism on Shinto in early Japan; the relationship between shrine cults and nature; and the role of shrine and temple ritual in the Japanese state of the Heian period.3/5(2).

"But for anyone interested in Shinto studies, religion andnationalism, and the contested and ever-changing nature ofreligious traditions, this is an essential read." (ReligiousStudies Review, 1 March ) "Written by two scholars at the forefront of the study ofJapanese religions, this book offers much more than a ‘briefhistory’.Reviews: 4.

“You know, I have now been to a number of these Shinto shrines and I have seen quite a few rites, and I have read about it, thought about it; but you know, I don’t get the ideology. I don’t get your theology.” Shinto priest: (polite, as though respecting the foreign scholar’s profound question.Shinto Overshadowed by Buddhism.

The introduction of Buddhism to Japan immediately sparked the interest of Japan's ruling elite, and within a century Buddhism became the state creed, quickly supplanting Shintō as the favorite of the Japanese imperial court (Mahayana Buddhism was the form favored by the court).Buddhism brought new theories on government, a means to establish strong .In The Essence of Shinto, revered Shinto master Motohisa Yamakage explains the core values of Shinto and explores both basic tenets and its more esoteric points in terms readily accessible to the modern Western shows how the long history of Shintoism is deeply woven into the fabric of Japanese spirituality and mythology--indeed, it is regarded as Japan's very sp/5(49).